Medical Coding Classes: What You Will Learn

 Medical Coding Classes


The demand for qualified professionals in the medical records and health information fields is quite high. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the field is expected to increase by 15% between 2014 and 2024. This growth rate is astronomical compared to other professions and it is also noted by the U.S. BLS that 217,600 people will be employed in the health information industry, including medical coders and medical billers, by the year 2024.
With the industry on an upward swing, you may be thinking about taking medical coding classes to get certified by passing the AAPC exam. If that’s the case, you’ll want to know what to expect. Below, we’ve provided some information on what you’ll learn when you’re admitted into Allied Prep, a leading medical coding school in New Orleans:
Exam Preparation
In order to become a Certified Professional Coder (CPC), you’ll need to pass the AAPC exam. You do not need a professional degree to enter into this profession. During our 16 week medical coding program, you’ll be taught by an instructor that has years of real world experience in the health information industry. The AAPC exam will cover codes utilized by medical facilities, hospitals, and private practices across the country. During your coursework with Allied Prep, we’ll help you learn the codes and terminology you need to pass your exam. You’ll also be given practice tests so you feel prepared and confident when you take the real exam.
Anatomy of the Body
As part of the medical coding program, you’ll be taught human anatomy. This will enable you to bill insurance companies for not only the correct codes, but also the right body parts. Many people don’t know this, but the medical codes used are body part specific. Therefore, you’ll need to possess an in-depth understanding of the body’s function, layout, and anatomy.
Terminology for Medical Coding
Terminology is not only a huge part of the AAPC exam, it will also be a big part of your day-to-day job as a Certified Professional Coder. Medical providers use certain terms when describing illnesses, diagnoses, and courses of treatment. They will use this terminology when entering their notes and it is up to medical coders to be able to transcribe and understand what the medical professional has written and said. Medical professionals may also use certain abbreviations or shorthand. In order to bill insurance companies appropriately, medical coders will have to recognize these terms with ease.
Ready to Get Started?
The great thing about our program is that it can be completed in-person or online. You’ll have complete flexibility, yet learn the skilled you need to get an entry level position as a medical coder once you’ve completed your certification. To learn more, contact Allied Prep today! We’d be happy to tell you more about our programs, requirements, as well as how we make education affordable for our students.

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